Filed under
Brian Oglesbee, American (b. 1951)
Brian Oglesbee - Abiogenisis
Brian Oglesbee
Abiogenisis
C-Type Color Photograph
1987
8 x 10 inches

Signed, titled dated and A.P. on verso.

View Brian Oglesbee - Abiogenisis photograph
View Brian Oglesbee - Lilacs photograph
View Brian Oglesbee - Lupines photograph
View Brian Oglesbee - Hysteron Proteron photograph
View Brian Oglesbee - Herbie in the Kitchen photograph
View Brian Oglesbee - Tom in the Window photograph
View Brian Oglesbee - Ground with Mirror photograph
View Brian Oglesbee - Room with Mirror photograph
View Brian Oglesbee - Abinitio photograph
View Brian Oglesbee - Lamp Room photograph
View Brian Oglesbee - Fenestra photograph
View Brian Oglesbee - Room with Red Stool photograph
View Brian Oglesbee - Chive Room photograph
View Brian Oglesbee - Figure with Fruit photograph
View Brian Oglesbee - Figure with TV photograph
View Brian Oglesbee - Fluxional Figure photograph
View Brian Oglesbee - Toward Metamorphosis I photograph
View Brian Oglesbee - Water Series # 54 photograph
View Brian Oglesbee - Water Series 70 #2 photograph
View Brian Oglesbee - Water Series 41 photograph
View Brian Oglesbee - Water Series 12 photograph
View Brian Oglesbee - Water Series 72 #16 photograph

Brian Oglesbee has been interested in photography since the age of twelve. He attended the Art Institute of Chicago for photography. His work is found in the permanent collections of the George Eastman House, the International Center of Photography, the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, and the Musee de l’Elysee in Lausanne, Switzerland.

In the 1980s, Oglesbee became well known for his series of color photographs of room interiors. He portrays scenes of bright, but not blinding, colors, which take the viewer into the imaginative mind of Oglesbee. More recently, he has been working with black and white film. His two beautiful series, Figure/Foliage and Water Series, are shot in large format. He captures the natural elements of water and astoundingly does not alter or manipulate these images at all. Oglesbee says of his work, “I think art reflects on the undefinable nature of life and our place in nature. I hope viewers would be moved to feel something of that mystery.”